Latest News


May
26
2022

Due to ongoing hot and dry weather conditions and increased risk for wildfire activity, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is implementing Stage 2 fire restrictions in three of its four Arizona districts ahead of the Memorial Day weekend. BLM-managed public lands in the Phoenix District, Colorado River District and Gila District are affected. 

https://www.blm.gov/press-release/dry-hot-conditions-lead-additional-fire-restrictions-most-blm-lands-arizona

BLM Arizona Fire Restrictions: https://www.blm.gov/programs/public-safety-and-fire/fire/regional-info/arizona/fire-restrictions

Arizona Interagency Fire Restrictions Map: https://wildlandfire.az.gov/fire-restrictions 

 

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May
26
2022

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the U.S. Too much sun can cause skin cancer. Spending time outside is a great way to be physically active, reduce stress, and get vitamin D. You can work and play outside without raising your skin cancer risk by protecting your skin from the sun. Most skin cancers are caused by too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. UV rays are an invisible kind of radiation that comes from the sun, tanning beds, and sunlamps. UV rays can damage skin cells. Protection from UV rays is important all year, not just during the summer. UV rays can reach you on cloudy and cool days, and they reflect off of surfaces like water, cement, sand, and snow. In the continental United States, UV rays tend to be strongest from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daylight saving time (9 a.m. to 3 p.m. standard time). The UV Index forecasts the strength of UV rays each day. If the UV index is 3 or higher in your area, protect your skin from too much exposure to the sun.

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May
25
2022

New CDC study finds one in five adults ages 18–64 years and one in four ages 65 years and older who survived COVID-19 had a new condition at least 4 weeks after their COVID-19 illness that may be associated with the past illness. Regardless of age, adult COVID-19 survivors had twice the risk of developing a blood clot in the lung or a new respiratory condition. 

Talk to your health care provider if you still have symptoms or develop new symptoms after a previous infection. Learn more: https://bit.ly/MMWR7121.

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May
24
2022

Heat illness is a preventable condition, but has been the number one weather-related cause of death in the United States. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), heat illness causes more deaths than hurricanes, lightning, tornadoes, floods, and earthquakes combined. From 2009 to 2019, over 2,000 deaths were caused from exposure to excessive natural heat. Of deaths among Arizona residents, 34 percent occurred in older adults over the age of 65. The Heat and Older Adults Safety Toolkit (HOAST) was created to provide older adults and caregivers information to stay safe in the heat.

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May
24
2022

The CalHOPE Together for Wellness website has easy­-to-navigate wellness tools, including ones that educate and provide stress­-management and coping skills.

The University of California, Los Angeles partnered with CalMHSA to create these online resources to support Californians negatively impacted by the stressors brought on by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Please visit https://calhope.semel.ucla.edu/ for more information.

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May
23
2022

Your body keeps itself cool by letting heat escape through the skin, and by evaporating sweat (perspiration). If your body does not cool properly or does not cool enough, you might suffer from a heat-related illness.

Anyone can be susceptible to heat-related illness. Those at greatest risk are infants and young children, adults over 65, people who are homeless, people who are overweight, people who overexert during work or exercise, and people who are physically ill or on certain medications, such as for depression, insomnia, or poor circulation. Heat-related illness may be serious or even deadly if unattended.

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May
20
2022

A Tribal Distribution of 5.25 Million for all adult enrolled members has been approved. All checks will be mailed out to the current mailing address on file with the Revenue Distribution Department by May 20, 2022 in the amount is $1,782.08.

Tribal Members 18-20 Years of Age:  You must be 18 years of age before or by May 20, 2022 to receive this payment during this distribution. If you turn 18 after the mail out date, you will receive your payment at that time. Please contact the Tribal office to ensure that your address is correct. If you are already the age of 18 and over, you must call for yourself. Your parents can no longer request information or change your address unless there is a Power of Attorney on file.

Power of Attorney:  A current copy of a Power of Attorney, Guardianship/Conservator must be on file with the Revenue Distribution Department. Checks will be mailed to the assigned Agent. If the POA has not been updated from last year(s) please contact Revenue Distribution.

Mail:  Please allow (7) seven business days after May 20, 2022 to receive your check. If you do not receive your check by May 31, 2022 please contact the Revenue Distribution Department. If a stop payment is necessary, it will take forty-eight hours before a replacement can be re-issued. THERE WILL BE NO EXCEPTIONS.

Note: If you need to update your mailing address, please do so by calling 760-919-3600 ext. 215. You can also email or fax to the numbers below. Please make all necessary changes as soon as possible. A 1099 will be issued for the 2022 Tribal Distribution in January 2023.

Please submit your address change to Finance/Revenue Distribution no later than May 13, 2022 at 5:00 p.m.

Any questions may be submitted to:

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May
20
2022

The Quechan Social Service Direct Assistance Program and Financial Assistance is closed as of Monday, May 16, 2022 until further notice.

If you have any questions please contact the office at (760) 572-0201 ext. 202.

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May
19
2022

The Calhope Red Line, a peer support program run by the California for Urban Indian Health (CCUIH), is a phone, chat, and video chat service providing national, state, and county resources, referrals, and trauma informed support for urban Indian and tribal populations.  These include resources related to Covid-19, social services, and financial resources.

Empowering AIAN with tools and services to build resiliency and navigate the COVID-19 crisis.

Reach Out:
Visit: https://ccuih.org/redIine/

Call: 1-888-368-4090 Text: 916-252-5002

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May
17
2022

Every home in the United States is now eligible to a third set of free at-home, rapid Covid-19 tests.  If you have already ordered your first two sets, order a third today at COVID.GOV /TESTS.

Orders will be delivered by USPS to your household.

The Quechan Office of Emergency Management also has free at-home tests available. Please call Jillian Attaway at (928) 587-5524 for more information.

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May
16
2022

The graduating classes of 2022 are ready to celebrate a major milestone in their lives. Let’s help them celebrate their hard work safely!

Check out the California Department of Public Health Safe and Smart Event Attendance checklist to ensure you and your family have safe and fun graduation celebrations together.

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May
11
2022

May is Mental Health Awareness Month

Cal HOPE Connect offers safe, secure, and culturally sensitive emotional support for all Californian's who may need support relating to COVID-19.

Cal HOPE has a statewide experienced workforce comprised of peers, community mental health workers, and other non-licensed personnel. Individuals in need of emotional and/or crisis support can receive "visits" by phone, video-conference, smart device, or computer chat. Depending upon needs and situation, family and/or group support sessions are also available. Individuals also may be connected to county-based services.

Please visit https://www.calhopeconnect.org/ for more info and to access this service. 

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May
10
2022

Your Actions Save Lives

Protect yourself, family, friends and our community by following these prevention measures:

  • Wear A Mask, Especially When Required: Masks are strongly recommended for all individuals in most indoor settings. Masks are required for everyone in high transmission settings like emergency shelters, health care settings, correctional facilities, homeless shelters and long-term care facilities. Local jurisdictions may have additional requirements beyond state requirements based on local conditions.
  • Upgrade Your Mask: Good fit and filtration continue to be the best way to get the most out of your mask. The best masks for preventing COVID-19 include the KN95 and KF94. No matter what kind of mask you wear, check the fit by avoiding gaps above the nose or on the sides.
  • My Vaccine Record: is an easy way to show vaccination status at venues or businesses that require proof of vaccination. Visit myvaccinerecord.cdph.ca.gov today to get your vaccine record. A copy can also be requested from IHS or your local health department.
  • Recommendations if You’re Sick or Have Been Exposed: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (fever, cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, muscle or body aches), or believe you have been exposed, get tested, call your health care provider, and stay home and away from others.
  • Wash hands with soap and water for at least 30 seconds.
  • Add Your Phone to the Fight: Sign up for COVID-19 exposure notifications from CA Notify. Also, individuals who test positive for COVID-19 – including those who test at home – are able to alert others of a potential exposure more quickly and conveniently. Individuals can now initiate the notification process as soon as they are aware of their positive test result. For more information, please visit the "Notify Others" page on CA Notify. For Arizona residents, WeHealth offers similar COVID-19 exposure notifications. For information regarding Arizona WeHealth, please visit WeHealth, the App Store, or Google Play to download.  

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May
10
2022

With high winds and blowing dust in our area, the risk for Valley fever is increased. Valley fever is an infection caused by the fungus Coccidioides. Anyone who lives in or travels to the southwestern United States (Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, or Utah), or parts of Mexico or Central or South America can get Valley fever. Valley fever can affect people of any age, but it’s most common in adults aged 60 and older. It is not contagious and coccidioides spores have to circulate in the air after contaminated soil and dust are disturbed by humans, animals, or the weather. When people breathe in the spores, they are at risk for developing Valley fever. A few ways to decrease your risk are to:

  • Stay inside during dust storms and close your windows.
  • Avoid activities that involve close contact to dirt or dust, including yard work, gardening, and digging without proper safety gear.
  • Use air filtration measures indoors.
  • Clean skin injuries well with soap and water to reduce the chances of developing a skin infection, especially if the wound was exposed to dirt or dust.

Please visit https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/coccidioidomycosis/risk-prevention.html for more information and talk to your health care provider if you have questions.

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May
5
2022

May is Mental Health Matters Month and the Quechan Office of Emergency Management in partnership with the California Department of Health Care Services is now offering CalHOPE resources.

CalHOPE delivers crisis support for communities impacted by a national disaster. We will be posting throughout the month of May with more resources through CalHOPE.

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Apr
29
2022

Do I qualify for a COVID-19 vaccine booster and which one?

Which primary vaccine series did you complete?

Pfizer-BioNTech or Comirnaty

  • You may get a single booster dose if:
    • It's been at least 5 months since completing a primary series AND you are:
    • Age 12+
  • If eligible, you may get a single booster dose of:
    • Pfizer-BioNTech*
    • Moderna
    • Janssen (J&J)
  • You may get a second booster dose if:
    • It's been at least 4 months since the first booster dose AND you are:
    • Age 50+ OR age 12+ with certain kinds of immunocompromise
  • If eligible, you may get a second booster dose of:
    • Pfizer-BioNTech*
    • Moderna

*Only Pfizer-BioNTech can be used for first and second booster doses in those ages 12 through 17.

Moderna or Spikevax

  • You may get a single booster dose if:
    • It's been at least 5 months since completing a primary series AND you are:
    • Age 18+
  • If eligible, you may get a single booster dose of:
    • Moderna
    • Pfizer-BioNTech
    • Janssen (J&J)
  • You may get a second booster dose if:
    • It's been at least 4 months since the first booster dose AND you are:
    • Age 50+ OR age 18+ with certain kinds of immunocompromise
  • If eligible, you may get a second booster dose of:
    • Pfizer-BioNTech
    • Moderna

Janssen (J&J)

  • You may get a booster dose if:
    • It's been at least 2 months since completing primary vaccination AND you are:
    • Age 18+
  • If eligible, you may get a single booster dose of:
    • Janssen (J&J)
    • Moderna
    • Pfizer-BioNTech
  • You may get a second booster dose if:
    • It's been at least 4 months since the first booster dose AND you are:
    • Age 50+ OR age 18+ with certain kinds of immunocompromise
  • If eligible, you may get a second booster dose of:
    • Pfizer-BioNTech
    • Moderna

For more information, visit www.fda.gov/covid19vaccines.

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Apr
20
2022

With the Memorial Day Holiday fast approaching the Quechan Tribe will be extending
the hours of access to the cemetery for clean-up of family plots.
Hours are: 5:00 AM to 12:00 AM.

Security will be in the area during clean-up hours and will be stationed on-site during
the early morning hours.

Thank you.
Quechan Tribal Council

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Apr
20
2022

COVID-19 can make some children very sick. A new MMWR report finds that among nearly 400 children ages 5–11 years hospitalized with COVID-19 during the first few months of Omicron:

  • 9 in 10 were unvaccinated
  • 7 in 10 had COVID-19 as the main reason for hospitalization
  • 3 in 10 had no underlying conditions
  • 2 in 10 were admitted to the ICU

Staying up to date with COVID-19 vaccines is the best way to protect all children from COVID-19

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Apr
18
2022

Older adults are at higher risk of severe disease and death from COVID-19. Protect your loved ones from COVID-19 by encouraging them to get vaccinated and helping them register and get to the vaccination site.

 

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Apr
18
2022

The Environmental Protection Office (EPO) will be collecting old appliance and tire roadside pick up, Starting April18, 2022 through the end of May 30, 2022.

In order to get your items picked up, please call and make an appointment with the Quechan Environmental Protection Office at 760-572-2969 or 928-920-3996. Once you’ve made an appointment and on the list, please place old appliances (washers, dryers, refrigerators, TV’s) and tires out near road during these dates above. Please have refrigerators and freezers emptied and cleaned prior.

Please make sure to speak to EPO and make an appointment or your items will not be picked up and will be your responsibility!

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